The Himalayas, roof of this world

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The Himalayas stretch through 5 countries.

The Himalayas is the highest mountain range in the world, and has 9 out of 10 of the world’s highest peaks, including Mount Everest. These mountains, referred to as the Third Pole, are the source of some of Asia’s major rivers and also help to regulate our planet’s climate. For centuries people here have developed a unique culture that weaves nature and people together into the same fabric of life. The region is the birthplace of the Buddha, and is full of sacred natural sites such as secret valleys and high mountain lakes that predate ancient Hinduism.

Keep calm like Yak in Himalaya Mountains.

Keep calm like Yak in Himalaya Mountains.

Where are the Himalayas?

The Himalayan range stretch across the northeastern portion of India. They cover approximately 1,500 mi (2,400 km) and pass through the nations of India, Pakistan,  Afghanistan, China, Bhutan, Tibet and Nepal. The Himalayan range is made up of three parallel ranges often referred to as the Greater Himalayas, the Lesser Himalayas, and the Outer Himalayas.

The many challenges of the Himalayas

The Himalayas face many challenges, and governments are under pressure to provide for their people and secure their natural heritage. Forests are strained as demand continues to grow for timber and food crops. Protected areas are becoming isolated pockets, and international criminal networks are emptying forests of rare wildlife to feed the voracious illegal market. The impact of global climate change is melting the once-mighty Himalayas at a rate faster than ever recorded in human history, jeopardizing a vital source of fresh water for billions of people in Asia.

K2 in Pakistan, tallest peak in the world

K2 in Pakistan, tallest peak in the world

The WWF conservation project in the Himalayas

WWF has worked in the region since the start of the conservation movement and the founding of our organization in 1961. By joining hands with governments, local communities, and supporters around the world, we have made progress for wild species and natural landscapes. But more needs to be done to forge a sustainable future for the Eastern Himalayas.

The Himalayas is the highest mountain range in the world and has 9 out of 10 of the world’s highest peaks, including Mount Everest. These mountains, referred to as the Third Pole, are the source of some of Asia’s major rivers and also help to regulate our planet’s climate. For centuries people here have developed a unique culture that weaves nature and people together into the same fabric of life. The region is the birthplace of the Buddha and is full of sacred natural sites such as secret valleys and high mountain lakes that predate ancient Hinduism.

The Himalayas face many challenges, and governments are under pressure to provide for their people and secure their natural heritage. Forests are strained as demand continues to grow for timber and food crops. Protected areas are becoming isolated pockets, and international criminal networks are emptying forests of rare wildlife to feed the voracious illegal market. The impact of global climate change is melting the once-mighty Himalayas at a rate faster than ever recorded in human history, jeopardizing a vital source of fresh water for billions of people in Asia.

Progress for wild species and landscapes

WWF has worked in the region since the start of the conservation movement and the founding of our organization in 1961. By joining hands with governments, local communities and supporters around the world, we have made progress for wild species and natural landscapes. But more needs to be done to forge a sustainable future for the Eastern Himalayas.

More about the Himalayas

Gangkhar Puensum is the highest mountain in the world unclimbed by man

Biggest Mountains in Asia

Nepal

Tibet

 

 

Source: WWF

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